Ann Bauer

Author’s archive

A Little Something Sweet

A Little Something Sweet

Petite women in a small shop on a quaint stretch of Marshall Avenue are producing miniature delicacies: macarons the size of 50-cent pieces, and cupcakes, some small enough to fit
Better Than Good for You

Better Than Good for You

Cruciferous vegetables are all the rage. Check the menus: The Sample Room in Northeast Minneapolis serves a terrific roasted vegetable salad with grilled Brussels sprouts over spinach; Café Lurcat offers
Red Roses, Black Pudding

Red Roses, Black Pudding

It’s not that you need help. Of course you don’t. But here it is, the month of hearts and love and romance. You’ve got a special someone in mind, and
Stoke Up

Stoke Up

There are few clear advantages to living in a place where winter begins on October 10th. But here’s one: Like pub owners on the damp English moors and Celtic bluffs,
On the Hunt for Venison

On the Hunt for Venison

It’s gotten harder and harder to sit down and enjoy a nice, juicy venison steak. Used to be you bought a license, threw on blaze orange, and tromped into the
Risotto

Risotto

Twice, my friend Lisa has tried to teach me to make risotto. The first time, I drank a glass of wine while watching her stir things into a pot. This
Eating Kermit

Eating Kermit

Frog legs are, for me, like veal or endangered bluefin tuna. First, I harbor a weird affection for frogs that I suspect goes back to Sesame Street. Second, I’ve become
The Saffron at Saffron

The Saffron at Saffron

To name a restaurant Saffron is to conjure associations of the rare and precious. Like natural pearls and golden caviar, saffron is expensive—about $150 an ounce. But the name also
No Way, Jose

No Way, Jose

About tequila, I have good news and I have bad. The good news is that tequila sales are growing faster than those of any other spirit, and the Twin Cities
Heartland’s Backyard Ingredient

Heartland’s Backyard Ingredient

Some vegetables are more fashionable than others. Who can say why? Ramps got rock-star attention when they started appearing on Twin Cities menus several years ago, heralded by servers as
Good Wine, Cheap

Good Wine, Cheap

Who’s profiting from this recession, you ask? The usual suspects: pawnbrokers, debt collectors, an entire gold-mining town in Nevada. But also Chris Eriksson, a 39-year-old financial advisor with Merrill Lynch
Rare Reds

Rare Reds

Amarone is one of the winemaking world’s most wonderful contradictions. An Italian wine made of dried grapes from the Valpolicella production zone—mostly Corvino with smaller percentages of Rondinella and Molinara—it
Hurts So Good

Hurts So Good

Most people, if they eat wasabi, mix a little with soy sauce and dip their sushi in it. Others (I am one) eat wasabi plain, slathering it on their tuna