Minnesota Adds 2,900 Jobs in March

Minnesota Adds 2,900 Jobs in March

Top sectors for job gains include trade, transportation and utilities, as well as manufacturing.

Things are trending up for the Minnesota workforce, as the state gained 2,900 jobs in March, after a February which saw job cuts, according to figures released Thursday by the state’s Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED).
 
The positive news didn’t stop there: DEED also revised its February report, which stated 1,300 jobs had been lost in the month, to just 200 jobs lost.
 
Over the last 12 months, the state has gained 21,250 jobs, or a job increase of 0.7 percent. The nation, meanwhile, has been creating jobs at more than twice the state’s rate at 1.6 percent during the same time frame.
 
Minnesota trumps the national average, though, when it comes to its unemployment rate. The state’s rate held steady in March at 3.2 percent, while the U.S. unemployment rate was at 4.1 percent, also consistent with previous months.
 
DEED Commissioner Shawntera Hardy highlighted the change in the manufacturing sector as one significant contributor to the job uptick.
 
“Manufacturing has been one of the state’s key economic drivers so far this year, gaining 3,100 jobs in the last two months,” said Hardy. “The sector is growing at a healthy pace during a period when employers in manufacturing and most other industries are competing in a tight labor market.”
 
For March, the top sectors with job gains were trade, transportation and utilities with 1,900 new positions, and then manufacturing (up 1,500). These were followed by education and health services (up 800), information (up 700), professional services (up 200), and financial activities (up 100).
 
The state’s construction and other services divisions lost 1,000 jobs each in March, while logging and mining, leisure and hospitality, and government posts also fell.
 
In the past year, education and health services, trade/transportation/utilities, government, manufacturing and construction all added jobs, while the sectors of professional and business services, other services, financial activities, information, and logging and mining all summarily cut jobs.
 
In Minnesota, each of the state’s Metropolitan Statistical Areas gained jobs overall during the last 12 months, with Mankato leading the pack followed by Duluth-Superior. None of the areas monitored by DEED, however, have reported losses in employment in the last year.