Avocation to Vocation?

Avocation to Vocation?

Fredrikson asks: Does your hobby improve your work?

Sometimes, what you want to know is how the law will affect a restoration project. On the other hand, Sue Steinwall, a shareholder at the Minneapolis law firm Fredrikson & Byron, can tell you how a restoration project affects the practice of law.

Yes, it is cathartic at the end of the workday to do her own demolition as she refurbishes her 1884 side-entry colonial in St. Paul. But the firm’s sponsorship of the current exhibit The Louvre and the Masterpiece at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts set people at Fredrikson thinking about off-hours creativity and how they use it at work. Maybe it’s no coincidence that the African dancer (Keri McWilliams, pictured above) is poised as a courtroom litigator? That the orchid expert is an advisor to growing companies?

Steinwall is featured with others in Fredrikson & Byron’s new marketing campaign. She says this is what a seven-years-and-counting home restoration has taught her about real estate law and brownfields redevelopment: 1) “small steps”—nothing is insurmountable; 2) no matter how “godawful ugly” something looks, there’s potential; and 3) if a client should need it, “I’m pretty handy with a crowbar.”