Twin Cities Orthopedics Aims To Compete In Mpls. Sports Med Market

Twin Cities Orthopedics Aims To Compete In Mpls. Sports Med Market

One of its three new area clinics will be skewed toward sports performance and wellness services.

Minneapolis-based Twin Cities Orthopedics is broadening its horizons with one of its three new clinics opening next month: a suburban, Eden Prairie location pit against sports medicine providers in Minneapolis.
 
Twin Cities Orthopedics—Minnesota’s largest orthopedic group—said this week that it will open the Eden Prairie clinic alongside another in Maple Grove and a smaller space in Plymouth. Plans call for its 21,000-square-foot Eden Prairie space to compete with leading sports medicine clinics in Minneapolis. Chief among those competitors is the Rochester-based Mayo Clinic’s 22,000-square-foot sports medicine center in downtown Minneapolis’ Block E, which will now be called Mayo Clinic Square.
 

Most of the Eden Prairie clinic will be used for sports performance with a smaller than usual space used for traditional clinic visits. Included among the sports training and wellness services offered will be an open training area and labs for nutrition, dance, motion analysis and golf.
 
A new 21,000-square-foot Maple Grove clinic, meanwhile, will offer free, public yoga classes and boot camps. A practice spokeswoman said the building will be split evenly between clinic space and therapy/performance space. The smaller, 8,000-square-foot Plymouth West Health location will be dedicated to traditional clinic space and therapy services, she said.
 
“Our culture has become increasingly obsessed with competition and performance in youth sports in particular,” Twin Cities Orthopedics CEO Troy Simonson said in a news release. Simonson added that the group has seen an increased amount of single-sport athletes with over-use injuries and a “need for customized training, preventive care and education.”
 
Twin Cities Orthopedics, which has 86 physicians and more than 25 Minnesota locations, said it would continue to hire specially trained providers in physical therapy, hand therapy, athletic training and personal training. The practice declined to share specific new hire estimates.