Target Rolls Out Online Same-Day Delivery In Mpls

Target Rolls Out Online Same-Day Delivery In Mpls

The same day the retail giant reported that its profits fell 16 percent during the first quarter, it announced that it will soon begin testing a new delivery service to three major markets.

Target announced Wednesday that it will begin testing its same-day delivery service in select stores in Boston, Miami, and Minneapolis next month.
 
Within those cities, guests will be able to choose “Rush Delivery” on Minneapolis-based Target’s website, and for a $10 service charge they can receive packages that day—on orders placed before 1:30 p.m. Target is following suit with competitors like Walmart and Amazon, which already offer same-day delivery.

“This is all about delivering products and services more flexibly—and serving guests on their terms by providing more options,” Jason Goldberger, senior vice president of Target.com and Target mobile, said in a statement. “With these new services and tests like ‘Rush Delivery,’ we’re gauging guest appetite and building internal capabilities and technologies that will make Target a leading omnichannel retailer.”

Target said it hopes to be able to learn a lot from its three-city pilot testing, which it said will “undoubtedly” have kinks.

The rush delivery announcement follows another initiative Target started last year to blend its online and physical stores. In October, the company rolled out its store pickup option for online orders. Through that service, customers can purchase a product online and visit a store where it will be waiting for them to pick it up a few hours later.

During a conference call with analysts Wednesday, Target’s interim President and CEO John Mulligan, who recently replaced ousted CEO Gregg Steinhafel, said the company is going to become more experimental and take bigger risks in the future, both in its digital and in-store businesses.

The conference call followed Target’s recent first-quarter financial performance announcement, during which it reported a 16 percent loss.

Related Stories