St. Paul Lawyer Convicted Of Laundering Drug Money

St. Paul Lawyer Convicted Of Laundering Drug Money

A jury returned guilty verdicts Tuesday on all three counts against Robert Boedigheimer, which accused him of a money-laundering conspiracy.

A St. Paul attorney faces up to 35 years in prison for a money-laundering scheme involving his marijuana-dealing brother-in-law.
 
Robert Boedigheimer, 51, was convicted Tuesday of one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering, one count of money laundering, and one count of making a false statement to an IRS agent.
 
According to Minnesota’s U.S. Attorney’s Office, Boedigheimer conspired with Brandon Lusk, a marijuana dealer in southern Minnesota, to launder the proceeds from the sales of marijuana through his own law firm.
 
Boedigheimer was indicted on December 10. At the time, Boedigheimer’s attorney, Joseph Friedberg, told Minnesota Lawyer that there was no question that Boedigheimer was “stone-cold innocent.”

 
Lusk pleaded guilty in October 2011 to one count of conspiracy and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering. Lusk admitted to forming a company called Rochester Reliable Rentals, which acquired nine Rochester properties.
 
Then, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Lusk financed improvements and renovations to the properties with proceeds from his marijuana sales, with assistance from Boedigheimer. Lusk—along with another partner, Richard Kay—conspired to distribute more than 1,000 grams of marijuana. Lusk is currently awaiting sentencing.
 
Before forming his own firm, Boedigheimer spent 10 years as the managing partner at McCloud & Boedigheimer Law Firm. His former partner, Samuel McCloud, was also the target of criminal charges. In 2011, McCloud was sentenced to 18 months in prison for one count of tax evasion after he intentionally concealed at least $595,000 in income when reporting his taxes.
 
Boedigheimer faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison for the conspiracy count, 10 years for the money laundering count, and five years for the false statements count. A federal district court judge will determine the sentences.
 
“This case needed to be prosecuted because as a practicing lawyer, the defendant abused the trust that society places on the practice of law by laundering drug money through his law firm and obstructing a federal investigation,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Steven Schleicher said in a statement.

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