Report: Minnesota Fails To Make Health Care Prices Transparent

Report: Minnesota Fails To Make Health Care Prices Transparent

Health care price availability is becoming more important with rising costs and the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

Minnesota received an ‘F’ in a recent report that graded states on how readily available and transparent health care price information was to consumers.
 
Forty-two other states earned the same failing grade, according to nonprofits Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute and Catalyst for Payment Reform.
 
In particular, Minnesota was knocked for not having the data from its All Payer Claims Database (APCD) located on a publicly accessible website.
 
Last year, the Minnesota State Legislature requested the Department of Health prepare summary information from the Minnesota APCD for public access. Several months ago, that information was prepared and made available upon request.
 
The annual analysis, called the “Report Card on State Price Transparency Laws,” bears importance for the roughly 20 million Americans who received health care coverage per the Affordable Care Act. However, both recent coverage recipients and those who have had insurance for years are seeing their out-of-pocket costs increase, which is why price transparency has become a recent issue.
 
Only three states received an ‘A’ ranking—those being Colorado, Maine and New Hampshire. Oregon received a ‘B’; Virginia and Vermont both received a ‘C’; and Arkansas was given a ‘D.’