MnDOT Plans $1.1B in 2013 Road Work

The Department of Transportation’s plan to complete $1.1 billion worth of road construction projects this year may cause heavy delays and traffic this summer.

With summer weather comes swimming at the beach, jogging in the park, and of course . . . construction crews on every street corner. The Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) recently announced plans to complete $1.1 billion worth of road construction projects for 2013—many of which will occur this summer.
 
With more than 300 construction projects planned, 87 of which will occur in the Twin Cities, the state hopes to improve safety and mobility for motorists on highways, bridges, and other transportation infrastructure.
 
“The $1.1 billion that we are investing in our state transportation system this year will increase regional connections throughout the state, as well as support jobs and community-building that make Minnesota a great place to live and do business,” MnDOT Commissioner Charlie Zelle said in a statement.
 
Among the projects that will require the most construction and road closures: resurfacing on Interstate 494 from 34th Avenue South to France Avenue that will result in temporary lane closures; work on the travel lanes and bridges on the Interstate 35 east and west split in Burnsville; road repair work on the Interstate 694 and Highway 10 interchange in Arden Hills; and construction of an interchange on Highway 36 at English Street in Maplewood, which will result in road closures for 75 days. For further details, including maps of the areas that will be affected by construction, click here.
 
“We understand that some of these construction projects may temporarily add time to your commutes, and we appreciate your cooperation in keeping yourselves—and our crews—safe,” Zelle said. 
 
MnDOT expects to finish many of the large projects by November.
 
“This work helps maintain a strong transportation system,” Zelle said. “We know from a lot of study that the need for road construction is growing. As a state, we need to begin to work on solutions that will allow us to continue this level of work into the future.”