How to Keep Moving (When You’re Short on Time)

How to Keep Moving (When You’re Short on Time)

Rather than beating yourself up for missing workouts, think about small changes you can make at the office. Heather Corndorf, founder of Linden Hills fitness studio mXe, is a certified health coach. She speaks to businesses and advises individuals on movement and mindfulness. “In my opinion, going to the gym shouldn’t be a goal,” Corndorf says. “Movement and mindfulness are key to feeling more like yourself.” She suggests a few minor modifications at the office that pack a big punch.

  • Walking meetings. For those discussions that don’t require a presentation, walk and talk. It increases energy and focus.
  • Shake it off. When you’re feeling anxious or lethargic and need to recalibrate, shake your hands like you’re flicking off water while gently bouncing up and down on your toes. This increases blood flow throughout your body, giving you better mind-body connection.
  • Take the road less traveled. Choose the stairs over escalators and elevators.
  • Flip your tail. Good posture not only looks good, but it also feels good. Most people think thrusting your chest forward and wrenching your shoulders back is the way to improve posture. Instead, try this: Sitting in your chair, in your car, or at the table, pretend you have a tail. Instead of sitting on your tail, flip it behind you. Notice how starting at the base of your spine will affect how the rest of your spine responds. Don’t overdo it; rather, think of a happy dog or a proud peacock.
  • Mindful beginnings. Begin weekly team meetings with a 60-second meditation. Set a timer, close your eyes, and breathe. Notice how it improves focus, calms anxiety, and enhances listening.