Agreement Reached To End Shutdown, Avoid Default

Agreement Reached To End Shutdown, Avoid Default

A final bipartisan agreement was announced Wednesday that would end the government shutdown, and the House is reportedly expected to approve the deal before midnight.

After 16 long days of political gridlock, closed parks, and widespread furloughs, the federal government is making the final moves to end its partial shutdown and avoid a U.S. debt default.
 
Senate leaders announced Wednesday that they reached a final agreement on a deal that would extend the debt ceiling into February and reopen the federal government, the Associated Press reported.
 
Some Senate Republicans, who used the government funding deadline as leverage to potentially halt “Obamacare,” reportedly said they promised not to delay the final vote. The final deal was changed very little from what President Obama originally put forth last month.
 
The deal made virtually no concessions to the Republicans, reports the New York Times, other than some tightening of income verifications for people obtaining subsidized insurance under Obamacare.
 
The ending of the shutdown would provide back pay to the 800,000 affected federal workers, half of whom haven’t gone to work for the last 16 days.
 
Minnesota Management and Budget said that 3,000 state workers depend on federal funds, and thus saw their jobs in jeopardy as a result of the shutdown.
 
Although Minnesota was among the least-affected states during the shutdown, the announcement came just days before the Minnesota Department of Health expected to lay off about 105 employees.