Thrivent Drops The “For Lutherans” In Its New Logo

Thrivent Drops The “For Lutherans” In Its New Logo

Now open to all Christians, Thrivent Financial took another step away from its Lutheran exclusivity with a rebranding effort.

Thrivent Financial announced a brand change Monday that dropped the “for Lutherans” tag from its logo, reflecting the group’s shift to a less exclusive membership program.
 
The Minneapolis-based organization also swapped out the twisting heart-shaped ribbon symbol for a more solid heart with a dynamic cross swooshing over one side and coined a new slogan: “connecting faith and finances for good.”
 
“Updating our brand to make Christians feel welcome while honoring our past and the Lutheran families we have served for more than a century was something we gave a lot of thought to,” Marie Uhrich, vice president of membership marketing at Thrivent, said in a statement.
 
The new branding will begin appearing on stationary, signs, and marketing communications throughout 2014.

 
Thrivent is Minnesota’s third-largest private company based on revenue, behind Cargill and Carlson.
 
The company announced Monday that its revenue in 2013 was up 2.4 percent to $8.5 billion from the previous year. Although Thrivent is a non-for-profit organization, its “total surplus” reached $6.9 billion, 12.7 percent higher than 2012 and the all-time record amount for Thrivent. It was the fifth-consecutive year of growth for the company.
 
“We experienced an outstanding year in 2013,” Brad Hewitt, president and CEO of Thrivent, said in a statement. “In addition to our strong financial performance, our members voted to extend our common bond to help more Christians be wise with money and live generously.” 
 
In June, 72 percent of voting members approved the move to welcome Christians of all denominations into Thrivent’s membership. Twenty-one percent of Thrivent’s estimate 2.5 million members participated in the vote, one of the largest participation pools in group’s history.
 
In other news, Thrivent got caught up in a legal battle with the State of California in October over private policyholder information. California’s controller was conducting an audit of Thrivent’s “unclaimed property” practices and requested details, such as social security numbers from all of Thrivent’s policyholders in the U.S., Thrivent refused to divulge the information. Click here to learn more about the case.