St. John’s, U Of M Rank Highest For Return On Investment

A new report ranked 22 Minnesota colleges based on the long-term return on investment that they offer to graduates.
St. John’s, U Of M Rank Highest For Return On Investment

Prospective Minnesota college students looking for the greatest return on their educational investment should consider Saint John’s University.

That’s according to a new report from Affordable Colleges Online, an online provider of information about college costs. The organization analyzed data from 145 Minnesota colleges—collecting information from several sources, including federal entities like The National Center for Education Statistics and salary database website PayScale.com—in order to rank 22 of the state’s schools based on their respective returns on investment.

In a nutshell, ROI reflects a student’s lifetime “return” minus his or her education costs. The return represents the amount of money a college’s graduates earn, over a 30-year career, above and beyond the average income of someone with only a high school degree. “Costs” comprise tuition for the 2012-2013 school year, room and board, and other fees such as books.

Saint John’s—the Catholic liberal arts college located in Collegeville, west of St. Cloud—topped the list with an ROI of $860,800. It was followed by the University of Minnesota’s Twin Cities campus, which had an ROI of $825,900, according to the list. (The U of M’s $13,459 cost is considerably lower, however, than St. John’s $35,486, the study found.)

Rounding out the top five Minnesota schools are Carleton College in Northfield (ROI: $774,600), the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul ($753,700), and Macalester College in St. Paul ($672,500).

For its list, Affordable Colleges Online considered four-year, fully-accredited, degree-granting institutions. To view the full list of Minnesota colleges as ranked by return on investment, click here.

“We aim to educate so that potential students are aware of their options for obtaining a degree and, most importantly, for paying for one,” Affordable Colleges Online founder Dan Schuessler said in a statement.