Phillips Distilling Company announced Monday that it has added gin and cucumber-flavored vodka to its growing Prairie Organic spirits portfolio.

The Prairie Organic spirits line, which now includes vodka, gin, and cucumber-flavored vodka, is certified organic by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The suggested retail price for a 750-milliliter bottle of Prairie Organic Gin or Prairie Cucumber-Flavored Organic Vodka is $19.99, Phillips said.

A Phillips spokeswoman told Twin Cities Business that the release of the organic gin and the organic cucumber-flavored vodka completes the Prairie Organic line, although she declined to disclose information about the product line’s sales.

In 2008, Minneapolis-based Phillips partnered with a co-op of more than 900 Minnesota farmers, who are all stakeholders in the Prairie Organic brand, to create the line.

“The purpose of our farmer-owned distillery is to utilize sustainable production to handcraft superior organic spirits domestically and support Minnesota’s agricultural economy,” Phillips President and CEO Pedro Caceres said in a statement.

Phillips’ brands include UV Vodka, Revel Stoke Spiced Whisky, and SourPuss Liqueurs, among others. Last fall, Phillips introduced its UV Vodka line of flavored vodkas in Spain, marking its first foray into Europe. The distillery more recently debuted a candy bar-flavored vodka in its dessert-flavored category—a popular classification among consumers.
 
Phillips Distilling Company, which produces more than 70 different brands, is a spin-off of the Millennium Import Company; a company formed by late local businessman and philanthropist Edward Jay Phillips. Phillips licensed a couple of Polish brands to create luxury vodka as a new spirits category. In 2009, Phillips was inducted into Twin Cities Business’ Minnesota Business Hall of Fame.

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