Minnesota has long been known for high voter turnouts during elections, and 76 percent of the state’s eligible voters cast ballots in 2012. Now, the state is being recognized for good election administration.
 
Minnesota is one of seven “high-performing” states in terms of how it administered the 2008 and 2010 elections, according to a new report by The Pew Charitable Trusts.
 
The Elections Performance Index released Tuesday analyzed how each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia handled the voting process during the two elections cycles. Minnesota ranked third for its handling of the 2008 elections and fifth for the 2010 elections. Performance results for the 2012 elections will be available later this year, Pew said.
 
The study measured states’ performance based on 17 indicators, including voter turnout, wait times at polls, availability of online voter information tools, the percentage of voters with registration or absentee ballot problems, the number of military and overseas ballots rejected, and accuracy of voting technology.
 
“Minnesota continues to be recognized as top in the nation for both voter participation and for administration of elections,” Minnesota Secretary of State Mark Ritchie said in a statement. “I credit our dedicated local election officials and poll workers with the continuance of this stellar performance.”
 
The six other states that Pew recognized as high performers are Colorado, Delaware, Michigan, North Dakota, Washington, and Wisconsin. North Dakota topped all other states for its handling of the 2010 elections, while Wisconsin did the best job during the 2008 election cycle, according to Pew’s report.
 
Alabama, California, Mississippi, New York, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and West Virginia were the lowest-performing states during both election cycles, the report found.
 
The Pew Charitable Trusts is a Philadelphia-based nonprofit that offers research and analysis on topics such as the environment, economic policy, and health and human services.
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